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Wax Myrtle

Wax Myrtle (Myrica cerifera) – This small tree or large shrub is adaptable to many habitats, growing naturally in wetlands, near flowing bodies of water, sand dunes, fields, hillsides, pine barrens, and in both needleleaf and mixed broadleaf forests. Easily grown as a specimen plant because it can thrive in most conditions and is salt tolerant, it can be pruned or shaped into a hedge. Thirty species of birds thrive on the fruit of the wax myrtle. Other names for this plant are the Southern Wax Myrtle, Southern Bayberry, Candleberry, Bayberry tree and Tallow shrub. We use it not only in the garden, but for candlemaking (bayberry candles) and as a medicinal plant. The Native Americans used it as a pain killer, diuretic, tonsil gargle, for stomach aches, worms and dysentery.

Wax Myrtle Leaves

Wax Myrtle Leaves